Is Fashion Art?

A couple of instant coffee granules miss the cup as they often do first thing in the morning. With slow sleepy swipes, I mop them up while I wait for the kettle to boil. If I’ve managed to convey the right number of coffee granules from the coffee jar to my mug, and added precisely the right amount of sugar, milk and hot water, then it will be a good cup of coffee. But if I don’t get ratio exactly right, it’s yuck, which goes to show that there’s an art to making a decent cup of java. Or is there? An art to making coffee, I mean.

The question of what constitutes “Art” with a capital T has been around for a long time. People pretty much agree that making a good cup of coffee is not an art but there is still a lot of dissent about certain modes of expression like writing, movie making and fashion. There is the idea that fashion cannot be an art because it evolved from sewing and tailoring which is a craft even though tailoring has been referred to as “architecture” and the draping of fabric across the body as being “sculptural”. Many designers make references to art and artistic theories and concepts in their work yet are nevertheless relegated to the ranks of the frivolous where haute couture is viewed as the fetish of the financially well-to-do. And once haute couture and runway collections have been watered down for consumption by the general public then they are seen as nothing more than financial commodities and functional apparel in the marketplace.

Another reason why fashion is not considered to be art is because, as with film making, a number of people performing different functions take part in the creation of a garment, such as the designer, fabric producer, pattern cutter and seamstress to name but a few. Because designers often don’t work alone to produce a garment, they don’t fit with the traditional view of the artist as a solitary genius and are therefore not considered artists even though their vision of what the garment will look like is their own.

In short, there is no clear-cut answer as to whether fashion is Art or not because there are so many ways to interpret and use an individual garment. It can be seen as protection from the elements, an expression of belonging to a particular socio-cultural group, as a personal form of expression when it is worn, or in its purest sense, as the embodiment of the vision of its creator, the designer. Because fashion is so fluid and open to interpretation, it fits in with the theories of many disciplines and forms of expression, of which Art is only one.

Applying For Fashion Design School Can Change Your Life

At some point every little has dreamed of going to fashion school. It’s a fast paced, artistic and highly profitable environment. Fashion design school isn’t always easy though, it requires an intense application process and tough classes. Even though it isn’t the same as say, Engineering, it still emphasizes on artistic skill, math for drawing, and promoting your ideas.

The application process is the same as joining any other college, but you will need a portfolio to show off your talent and skills. It may help to have solid copies of your designs on hand too. Fashion involves knowing how to sketch your ideas, math for measurements and drawings, as well as the ability to construct pieces from almost anything.

The challenges of fashion art school are considerable. You will be in an environment with many others that are fighting for the same attention. You will have to compete and outshine the rest in order to ensure that you stand out from the crowd – which is the most important concept for fashion school.

In all honesty applying for fashion design school in fashionable cities is highly recommended. Going to school in New York City is the best option, and then various schools in California or Chicago. These big cities are the epicenters of fashion – and will give you great experience and edge over other students. If you can afford it, fashion schools in countries like Italy and France are excellent opportunities to hone your skill at designing.

Classes you may take while attending fashion design school include: business classes, art, photography, mathematics and English, history of fashion, and even graphic design courses. It truly depends on what type of clothing you want to create and what your overall goals are for a career in this field. However, business is likely one of the most important courses you can take. Since being a designer is a business, you must know how to be an ethical owner of a company, and how to deal with customers. Business classes will also help you learn to communicate with clients and sell your product to them more effectively.

While it seems easy initially, it’s far from that. You will still have to take basic classes as well as intense art classes to ensure that you understand the fundamentals of fabrics, colors, and more. Fashion design isn’t just about making pretty clothes all day. It takes a great deal of skill and work to achieve the results that you want and what is demanded by the client and the world around you. Also, this type of school can become pretty expensive. Luckily for most, scholarships, grants, and loans, are all a possibility. These monetary benefits can help you pay for your tuition so that you can stay in school while working towards an awesome career in the fashion field.

Art And Fashion

The work of the fashion designers in our days is a form of art, though at first sight one might say such a frivolous thing like fashion has little to do with what we call art. But like the work of the artists, the work of the designers is an act of creation. And the bond between the two of them has a long history and goes both ways: many times fashion is reflected in art thus becoming a part; even more often art influenced the fashion.

We can trace this bond long time ago. It started with the prehistoric goddesses statuettes. Some of them show a network of thin lines which historians established to be the representation of the clothes.

From that time on there is a multitude of art representation of the fashion. We can find fashion reflected in the Egyptian, Roman or Greek statues of the Antiquity and in the Gothic statues of the 12th century churches. We can find it in a lot of famous paintings like the ones of Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Durer, Titzian or Pieter Bruegel the Eldest. We can find it in a painting which is a veritable lesson of perspective, like Velazquez’ Las Meninas and can be also considered a veritable lesson of the mid 17th century fashion.

Art influenced fashion even more often. The heavy and complicated Baroque made the clothes of that time to look just as heavy. Rococo remained complicated but the forms became lighter and so did the clothes and the textiles used to make them. In the 20th century the Cubism had echoes in the 1920’s tubular dresses. And these are just a few examples.

Today, in the era of fast communication and television shapes and patterns of the clothes are inspired by the art of different times and areas. Artists are called many times to help designers. Dali created clothes as well as textile designs for the designer Elsa Schiaparelli and they all bear his unique stamp. From women’s dress to any mens coat everything is made to serve the necessities and perspectives of our times. And that perspective influences the art and the fashion all the same.